If You Can See This, Let Me Know

This is as much an announcement as it is a test of all associated services. I have outgrown my website so I upgraded. I went from a free WordPress.com website/blog to a WordPress.org website self-hosted on Siteground. Click around and check out the difference. The biggest one is the glaring absence of ads. Those used to drive me mad. It’s actually why I decided to make the switch in the first place.

But let me start from the beginning…

WHY DID I LEAVE WORDPRESS.COM?

Don’t get me wrong, I love WordPress, which is why I am still using their services, just in a different capacity. They have beautiful themes, they’re pretty easy to work with, and they’re structured so you don’t have to worry about what something will look like on a different-sized screen. Those are all great things.

The biggest con for me was that they started to get greedy. When I first set up my websites on WordPress.com, they displayed an ad at the bottom of each blog post, and that was it. It was a reasonable amount of ads, and my static pages remained clean, so I was content. But recently, those ads have spread to every page, post, and widget area in multiples. There are drop-downs in a top banner and pop-ups at the bottom of the page, and no amount of custom CSS cheating will hide them. The only solution is to pay for a monthly subscription plan to remove them and gain a tiny bit more CSS customization.

I should say this is not meant to deter you from using WordPress.com. It’s still 100% worth it if you only have one website to worry about. Unfortunately for me, I have several websites hosted with them and the total cost for monthly plans for all of them came out to more than self-hosting (which is usually the more expensive option). So, even though I cringed, I decided it would ultimately be for the best if I made the switch.

I’m a grown up webmaster now. Got access to codes I should never be allowed to mess with.

WHY DID I CHOOSE SITEGROUND?

I did look into several options, including Bluehost, which is the one WordPress recommends. I decided to go with Siteground for two reasons:

  1. It came recommended by a friend who has experience with them. Not only do I trust his opinion, but now I have someone whose brains I can pick if I run into issues with any of my websites.
  2. They offer a reasonably priced plan for people with more than one website. The plan I chose allows me to create unlimited websites, as long as they fit within my storage limit. For me, that shouldn’t be a problem. Better, since I’m not limited to how many sites I can create, it gives me room to grow.

HOW DO I LIKE IT SO FAR?

Well, it’s only been a couple of days. I took advantage of their free website transfer services to transfer my main author website. There were a couple of hiccups along that path, mostly my fault because I didn’t know what I was doing. That one is still in the works, because reasons.

For this website, I went the solo route. I did the transfer, and the install, and the configuration. Because I used a different theme, I had to redo a lot of stuff, but it only took me a few hours to get it up and running and I am very happy with the final result.

Likes:

  • No ads
  • Full control over layout and appearance
  • Hundreds of plugins (if I ever need them)

Dislikes:

You can’t live preview the themes. That frustrates me so much you have no idea. In WordPress.com, when you’re picking a theme, you can click on the preview and it will take you to a fully functional website so you can see how the layout works. In WordPress.org, that’s not the case. When you click to preview the theme, it takes you to a bare bones blog page that shows you text layouts, but that’s it. It won’t even show you a fully functional front page, and that’s the most important part!

This is why I haven’t finished my author website yet. The theme I have now doesn’t work the same here as it did on WordPress.com. I’ll have to find a new one and do a total makeover again, which is going to be a pain in the ass, but also probably a good thing. My plan is to knock out the small, easy sites and then I’ll be able to focus on that monster.

WANNA HELP ME BETA TEST?

I could really use some help on one part of this whole thing. See, when you move your website, you have to install a Jetpack plugin to transfer your subscribers and activate the follow via email feature. I did that, and I’m hoping my subscribers are reading this in their inboxes right now.

If you’re one of them and you see this, please leave me a quick Hello in the comments to let me know it’s working. That’s all. I just need to know if the subscriptions carried over. And if the discussion functions work! LOL

Thanks in advance. 🙂

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How to Self-Publish and Not Go Broke

One of the core principles of communication they taught in my college business classes was: If you present a problem without offering a solution, you’re just whining. I started this blog with the intention of helping new and aspiring writers navigate the world of (self-)publishing, and that is still its primary focus, despite the occasional rant and whine.

With my last post, I presented a problem: Self-publishing costs time and money.

With this one, I would like to present a few workarounds and practical solutions that basically boil down to: It doesn’t mean you have to go broke to do it.

Be forewarned, this will be a very long post that essentially summarizes a large portion of this entire website, but I wouldn’t post it if I didn’t think it was important.

So let’s take it from the top.


The Process of Self-Publishing in 12 (Not So) Easy Steps


  1. Write a book
  2. Get it edited
  3. Copyright it
  4. Write your blurb and tag line
  5. Choose your distribution strategy and timeline
  6. Create your distribution accounts
  7. Format your book
  8. Cover your book
  9. Set your price
  10. Upload the files
  11. Click Publish
  12. Promote like the entire future of your writing career depends on it.

This list will be the basis for what’s about to follow. You’ll notice not all of the items on that list have a monetary cost attached to them. But I did say “time and money,” didn’t I? 🙂 That’s because your time is money. Free time isn’t really free. It’s time you could spend with your loved ones, or chilling out by yourself. Every hour you put into being a writer is work. Even if you don’t want to call it that. It’s work you expect to get paid for in the future through royalties, so it’s a cost that is meant to be recouped.

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